aid, human rights maps, poverty

Human Rights Maps (78): Numbers of immigrants and Amounts of Remittances

This is a map in the form of an animation. If the video doesn’t play, please click here.

More maps on migration are here and here; more maps on remittances here. Statistics on development aid and remittances are here and here respectively. More textual information on development aid and remittances is here and here respectively. Other human rights maps are here. And, finally, an overview of the reasons why migration is a human rights issue is here.

Standard
discrimination and hate, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (77): Hate Groups in the U.S.

hate groups in the US

hate groups in the US

(source/source, click on the image to enlarge)

And this is the number relative to the population size of each state:

hate groups in the US

(source)

There’s also an interactive version of the first map here, where you can find more information on the groups involved. The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 926 active hate groups in the U.S. in 2008. Since 2000, the number has climbed by more than 50 percent. A hate group is a group that has beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics. White nationalists, neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, border vigilantes and black separatist organizations are examples of hate group. Their activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing, but not necessarily advocacy of or engagement in violence or other criminal activity.

More on hate in general, on hate speech, on hate crime, on the KKK, and on racism in general. More human rights maps.

Standard
discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps, work

Human Rights Maps (76): Gender Wage Gap in the U.S.

women's earnings compared to men's, gender wage gap in the US

women's earnings compared to men's, gender wage gap in the US

(source)

Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work (art. 23 of the Universal Declaration). So unequal pay is a human rights issue, and is probably an indication of a deeper kind of discrimination. However, unequal pay is an indication of wage discrimination, not proof. If men and women, on average receive unequal pay, it’s only discrimination if they perform equal work, which isn’t necessarily the case.

More data here. More on gender discrimination in general is here.

Standard
human rights maps, war

Human Rights Maps (75): Military Spending Worldwide, as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

Some data for the year 2008:

Military Spending Worldwide as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

Military Spending Worldwide as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

(click on the image to enlarge)

And this is for the year 2010:

military spending percentage of GDP

military spending as percentage of GDP

military spending total

military spending, total

(source)

More on military spending (or “defense” spending) here. Some statistics here. More maps here.

Standard
human rights maps, law, poverty, work

Human Rights Maps (73): Minimum Wages in the U.S.

minimum wages in the US

(source, source)

First, why is this a human rights issue? Well, there’s article 23 of the Universal Declaration:

Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

And there’s generally the issue of the absence of poverty as a human right. A minimum wage is obviously intended to protect people from poverty. Economists disagree on the effectiveness of a minimum wage: some believe it helps to combat poverty, others say that it increases poverty because minimum wage level regulation creates job losses: the price of labor will be higher than the price that would be fixed by unhindered supply and demand of labor (read here why this is supposed to be the case). And job losses mean more poverty. However, the evidence for this is mixed, to say the least. See here, here, here or here for studies that show no adverse employment effects of a minimum wage.

In the U.S., when state and federal regulations differ, the higher of the two rates applies. Currently (2009), the “minimum minimum wage” is $7.25 per hour. A minority of states has minimum wages higher than the federal minimum.

An updated version of the map:

minimum wage laws map

(source)
Standard
discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (70): Gender Equality in Government

share of women in parliament map

share of women in parliament, change between 1997 and 2011

Here’s another version:

gender equality in politics map

gender equality in politics map

(source)

And yet another version:

proportion of seats held by women in national parliaments

National parliaments can be bicameral or unicameral. This map covers the single chamber in unicameral parliaments and the lower chamber in bicameral parliaments. It does not cover the upper chamber of bicameral parliaments. Seats are usually won by members in general parliamentary elections. Seats may also be filled by nomination, appointment, indirect election, rotation of members and by-election. Seats refer to the number of parliamentary mandates, or the number of members of parliament.
(source)

And this is the detail for the U.S.:

map percentage of women in U.S. state legislatures 2009

(source)

Parliament is obviously just one part of government. How about gender equality in other parts?

women in government map

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

Read more about the reasons why this is a human rights issue.

Standard
discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps, law

Human Rights Maps (69): Legalization of Homosexuality in the U.S.

In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Lawrence v. Texas invalidated the so-called “sodomy laws” that were still in force in 14 States at the time. In the decades before that, the other States gradually abolished their laws voluntarily. Here’s an overview:

repeal of sodomy laws in the US

(source)

The following 14 states still have sodomy laws on the books to this day:

is sodomy illegal map

(source)

Following Lawrence these laws became unenforceable, but one can see them as signaling official disapproval by the government of homosexuality.

Thanks to Lawrence, the U.S. compares favorably with the 80 or so other countries in the world where homosexuality is still illegal and where punishment for this “crime” can be very severe.

More on the legality or criminalization of homosexuality here. More on homophobia. More human rights maps.

Standard
citizenship, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (68): Immigration in the U.S.

The maps below show - for the years 1920, 1980 and 2000 – the percentages of foreign born populations in the different counties of the US (foreign born by country/continent of origin). You’ll have to click on the images to enlarge them. A fantastic interactive version is here (where you can see the actual numbers for a specific county, select a specific country of origin, look at other years etc.).

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 2000

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 1980

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 1920

(source)

Other immigration maps are here and here. More textual information on the subject is here. Statistics on migration (in the US and worldwide) are here. An explanation of why this is a human rights issue is here. Other human rights maps are here.

Standard
comedy, culture, globalization, intervention, political jokes and funny quotes

Political Jokes & Funny Quotes (58): The World According to Americans

the world according to americans

(source, click to enlarge)

And a slightly dated version:

the world according to Ronald Reagan

Some similar maps here, here and here. More serious maps on human rights are here. More on prejudice (including the famous Allport’s scale). And, to be fair on Americans, something about anti-americanism.

Standard