aid, human rights maps, poverty

Human Rights Maps (78): Numbers of immigrants and Amounts of Remittances

This is a map in the form of an animation. If the video doesn’t play, please click here.

More maps on migration are here and here; more maps on remittances here. Statistics on development aid and remittances are here and here respectively. More textual information on development aid and remittances is here and here respectively. Other human rights maps are here. And, finally, an overview of the reasons why migration is a human rights issue is here.

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discrimination and hate, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (77): Hate Groups in the U.S.

hate groups in the US

hate groups in the US

(source/source, click on the image to enlarge)

And this is the number relative to the population size of each state:

hate groups in the US

(source)

There’s also an interactive version of the first map here, where you can find more information on the groups involved. The Southern Poverty Law Center counted 926 active hate groups in the U.S. in 2008. Since 2000, the number has climbed by more than 50 percent. A hate group is a group that has beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics. White nationalists, neo-Nazis, racist skinheads, border vigilantes and black separatist organizations are examples of hate group. Their activities can include criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing, but not necessarily advocacy of or engagement in violence or other criminal activity.

More on hate in general, on hate speech, on hate crime, on the KKK, and on racism in general. More human rights maps.

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discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps, work

Human Rights Maps (76): Gender Wage Gap in the U.S.

women's earnings compared to men's, gender wage gap in the US

women's earnings compared to men's, gender wage gap in the US

(source)

Everyone, without any discrimination, has the right to equal pay for equal work (art. 23 of the Universal Declaration). So unequal pay is a human rights issue, and is probably an indication of a deeper kind of discrimination. However, unequal pay is an indication of wage discrimination, not proof. If men and women, on average receive unequal pay, it’s only discrimination if they perform equal work, which isn’t necessarily the case.

More data here. More on gender discrimination in general is here.

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human rights maps, war

Human Rights Maps (75): Military Spending Worldwide, as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

Some data for the year 2008:

Military Spending Worldwide as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

Military Spending Worldwide as Percentage of GDP and of World Total

(click on the image to enlarge)

And this is for the year 2010:

military spending percentage of GDP

military spending as percentage of GDP

military spending total

military spending, total

(source)

More on military spending (or “defense” spending) here. Some statistics here. More maps here.

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human rights maps, law, poverty, work

Human Rights Maps (73): Minimum Wages in the U.S.

minimum wages in the US

(source, source)

First, why is this a human rights issue? Well, there’s article 23 of the Universal Declaration:

Everyone who works has the right to just and favourable remuneration ensuring for himself and his family an existence worthy of human dignity, and supplemented, if necessary, by other means of social protection.

And there’s generally the issue of the absence of poverty as a human right. A minimum wage is obviously intended to protect people from poverty. Economists disagree on the effectiveness of a minimum wage: some believe it helps to combat poverty, others say that it increases poverty because minimum wage level regulation creates job losses: the price of labor will be higher than the price that would be fixed by unhindered supply and demand of labor (read here why this is supposed to be the case). And job losses mean more poverty. However, the evidence for this is mixed, to say the least. See here, here, here or here for studies that show no adverse employment effects of a minimum wage.

In the U.S., when state and federal regulations differ, the higher of the two rates applies. Currently (2009), the “minimum minimum wage” is $7.25 per hour. A minority of states has minimum wages higher than the federal minimum.

An updated version of the map:

minimum wage laws map

(source)
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discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (70): Gender Equality in Government

share of women in parliament map

share of women in parliament, change between 1997 and 2011

Here’s another version:

gender equality in politics map

gender equality in politics map

(source)

And yet another version:

proportion of seats held by women in national parliaments

National parliaments can be bicameral or unicameral. This map covers the single chamber in unicameral parliaments and the lower chamber in bicameral parliaments. It does not cover the upper chamber of bicameral parliaments. Seats are usually won by members in general parliamentary elections. Seats may also be filled by nomination, appointment, indirect election, rotation of members and by-election. Seats refer to the number of parliamentary mandates, or the number of members of parliament.
(source)

And this is the detail for the U.S.:

map percentage of women in U.S. state legislatures 2009

(source)

Parliament is obviously just one part of government. How about gender equality in other parts?

women in government map

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

Read more about the reasons why this is a human rights issue.

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discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps, law

Human Rights Maps (69): Legalization of Homosexuality in the U.S.

In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court’s Decision in Lawrence v. Texas invalidated the so-called “sodomy laws” that were still in force in 14 States at the time. In the decades before that, the other States gradually abolished their laws voluntarily. Here’s an overview:

repeal of sodomy laws in the US

(source)

The following 14 states still have sodomy laws on the books to this day:

is sodomy illegal map

(source)

Following Lawrence these laws became unenforceable, but one can see them as signaling official disapproval by the government of homosexuality.

Thanks to Lawrence, the U.S. compares favorably with the 80 or so other countries in the world where homosexuality is still illegal and where punishment for this “crime” can be very severe.

More on the legality or criminalization of homosexuality here. More on homophobia. More human rights maps.

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citizenship, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (68): Immigration in the U.S.

The maps below show - for the years 1920, 1980 and 2000 – the percentages of foreign born populations in the different counties of the US (foreign born by country/continent of origin). You’ll have to click on the images to enlarge them. A fantastic interactive version is here (where you can see the actual numbers for a specific county, select a specific country of origin, look at other years etc.).

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 2000

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 1980

largest foreign born groups per county in the us 1920

(source)

Other immigration maps are here and here. More textual information on the subject is here. Statistics on migration (in the US and worldwide) are here. An explanation of why this is a human rights issue is here. Other human rights maps are here.

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comedy, culture, globalization, intervention, political jokes and funny quotes

Political Jokes & Funny Quotes (58): The World According to Americans

the world according to americans

(source, click to enlarge)

And a slightly dated version:

the world according to Ronald Reagan

Some similar maps here, here and here. More serious maps on human rights are here. More on prejudice (including the famous Allport’s scale). And, to be fair on Americans, something about anti-americanism.

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human rights maps, poverty

Human Rights Maps (64): Child Poverty in the U.S.

child poverty rates in the U.S.

child poverty rates in the U.S.

child poverty rates in the U.S.

child poverty rates in the U.S.

(source)

US child poverty rate by state map

(source)

“Being poor” meaning having an income below the federal poverty level, which is about $20,000 a year for a family of four. Which is quite stingy:

poverty budget us poverty line

(source)

A poverty line, or poverty threshold, is the minimum level of income deemed necessary to achieve an adequate standard of living in a given country.

Determining the poverty line is usually done by finding the total cost of all the essential resources that an average human adult consumes in one year. This approach is needs-based in that an assessment is made of the minimum expenditure needed to maintain a tolerable life. This was the original basis of the poverty line in the United States, whose poverty threshold has since been raised due to inflation. (source)

More about the U.S. poverty line here.

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human rights maps, intervention

Human Rights Maps (63): Caring For What Happens in the World

Compared to other countries, the U.S. has always been very active in foreign policy, with varying success, and for good and bad. In the days of the Cold War, the main concern was the containment of communism, and consecutive U.S. governments (of both parties) were pleased to support gruesome right wing dictators all over the world (“he may be a bastard but he’s our bastard”).

However, after the collapse of communism in the 1990s, the U.S. began to understand that dictatorship and rights violations abroad, even of the non-communist type, are contrary to the national interest of the U.S., and also a moral problem in their own right. It is now generally accepted in the U.S. that the promotion of respect for human rights in other countries should be one of the major aims of foreign policy, and that intervention of some kind in the business of other countries can be justified if this is necessary for human rights (especially in cases of gross violations such as genocide).

Yet many in the U.S. worry about foreign “adventures”, even if human rights are at stake. Here is a poll showing decreasing levels of support for human rights as a foreign policy priority. And below is a very unscientific but funny measure of how much U.S. citizens care about the rest of the world:

countries america cares about

(source)

Here and here are posts on humanitarian intervention, a type of intervention limited to the most extreme rights violations, often involving military force.

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comedy, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (62): How Californians and New Yorkers See America, and How Americans See the World

funny graphs californians

And how New Yorkers see it – a lot of empty space apparently, just good enough to fly over:

Saul Steinberg's View of the World from 9th Avenue cover for The New Yorker, March 1976

Saul Steinberg’s View of the World from 9th Avenue cover for The New Yorker, March 1976

And how Americans see Europe:

Europe according to the USA

(source, source)

And the rest of the world:

world map of prejudice

prejudice map

(source, click map to enlarge)

And how Ronald Reagan saw the world:

the world according to Ronald Reagan

Of course, when you laugh at the way people see some other people, you’re being just as prejudiced. Hence, here’s an anti-prejudice map (click to enlarge):

anti-prejudice map

(source)

Another anti-stereotype map:

stereotype map

(source)

And another:

stereotype map

More on prejudice (including the famous Allport’s scale). More on religious freedom. More on national unity.

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human rights maps, intervention

Human Rights Maps (61): Countries That Have Hurt the Feelings of China

When diplomats lose their economic inhibitions and, exceptionally, replace economic self-interest by moral courage and criticize China for its human rights record at home (or, increasingly, abroad as well), or even when a government official simply meets the Dalai Lama without saying anything about China, it is as if the Chinese government plays a set of prerecorded responses. Every time, one hears the same, stale phrases about “intervening in the internal affairs of a sovereign country”, “hurting the feelings of the Chinese people”, “insulting the dignity of our nation,” and “disrespecting our people and their principles”. A Chinese blogger went through The People’s Daily (the Chinese version of the Pravda) to see which country is most disrespectful of China. On the first place is Japan, followed by the U.S. and NATO. But many countries seem to lack respect:

countries that have hurt chinese feelings

(source)

More on intervention in China here and here.

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human rights maps, religion

Human Rights Maps (58): State Religions

A state religion (also called an official religion, established church or state church) is a religious body or creed officially endorsed by the state. These are the countries that have a state religion:

state religions

state religions

(source)

Whether or not a country has a state religion can, of course, have consequences for religious freedom and religious plurality. See this post on religious freedom for more information.

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capital punishment, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (55): Death Penalty, Methods of Execution in the U.S.

usa methods of execution

(forgot where I got this from, sorry)

Perhaps a more up-to-date map is this one:

US death penalty methods

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

Some states still use the gas chamber:

US gas chamber usage

(source)

Here are the actual executions by gas chamber after the moratorium in the 1970s:

Post Furman US Gas Chamber executions

(source)

I think only Idaho and Oklahoma still use the firing squad. There recently was a convict in Utah who chose to be executed by firing squad. The U.S. Supreme Court, which reinstated the death penalty in 1977, banned the use of the firing squad in 2004. It allowed only a handful of inmates already on death row to opt for the method.

And this is the map for electrocution:

Map of US electric chair usage

(source)

A more theoretical post on the supposed merits of capital punishment and its deterrent effect is here. Other human rights maps are here.

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capital punishment, human rights maps, law

Human Rights Maps (54): Death Penalty, States in the U.S. That Allow(ed) the Execution of Juvelines

States in the U.S. That Allow the Execution of Juvelines

(source)

Here’s what the rest of the world thinks of killing children that have committed a crime:

world death penalty juvenile offenders

(source, source)

Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.S. 551 (2005), was a decision in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that it is unconstitutional to impose capital punishment for crimes committed while under the age of 18.

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human rights maps, war

Human Rights Maps (50): Internally Displaced Persons

In 2012, there were 28.8 million internally displaced people worldwide. This record high includes a five-fold increase in Syria due to the conflict there.

Some older numbers:

internally displaced persons

(click on the image to enlarge)

AFRICA contains half of the world’s Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)—those who have fled their homes but continue to live in their own countries. Sudan alone has over 4m of them, about the same number as the whole of Asia. Congo has another 2m or so, Somalia at least 1.3m. A score of other countries including Uganda, Zimbabwe and Kenya have hundreds of thousands more. In sum, there are about 12m IDPs across the continent. (source)

internally displaced people in africa

As these numbers tend to fluctuate a lot, because of the nature of the problem, here’s an update (dated February 2010):

internally displaced persons map

(source, source, source)

MDG : world map with number of IDP by conflict

(source)

More on this subset of the global refugee population.

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education, equality, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (49): Gender Equality in Primary Education

gender equality in primary education

(source)

The legend is a bit hard to read, so here’s what it says: number of girls per 100 boys in primary school in 2001 (couldn’t find a more recent map), light to dark: 97 or more, 90 to 97, 80 to 90, 70 to 80, less than 70.

More on gender equality.

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freedom, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (45): Journalists Killed

journalists killed

(source)

Look here for more recent data. The killing of journalists violates freedom of speech in several ways. Obviously the freedom of speech of the journalists concerned is violated, but the purpose of these killings is the message it sends to other journalists (close colleagues of those who are killed but all other journalists as well) and to the general public: “shut up if you want to be safe”. It’s the ultimate chilling effect.

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human rights maps, law

Human Rights Maps (44c): Countries That Have Ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

international covenant on economic social and cultural rights world map of states ratification

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights is, together with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the world’s main human rights treaty. Special about this treaty is that it includes so-called economic rights such as the right to a decent standard of living, the right to work, the right to a fair wage etc. Regular readers of this blog will know that we consider these rights to be very important (especially the right to a certain standard of living, i.e. the right not to suffer poverty).

Since it is a treaty, the Covenant imposes legal obligations on member states. More specifically, it forces them to work towards the implementation of these economic rights. As you can see from this map, a large majority of countries in the world have accepted and ratified this treaty (some have signed the treaty but have yet failed to ratify it), which means that they are bound by the rules that it contains. So-called “states-parties” have a legal obligation to respect the human rights mentioned in this treaty. The treaty (or “covenant”) is, unlike the Universal Declaration which is its origin, a piece of law, and part of the international system of law.

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human rights maps, law

Human Rights Maps (44b): Countries That Have Ratified the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

international covenant on civil and political rights world map of states ratification

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights is the world’s main human rights treaty. As you can see from this map, a large majority of countries in the world have accepted and ratified this treaty (some have signed the treaty but have yet failed to ratify it), which means that they are bound by the rules that it contains. So-called “states-parties” have a legal obligation to respect the human rights mentioned in this treaty. The treaty (or “covenant”) is, unlike the Universal Declaration which is its origin, a piece of law, and part of the international system of law. See also this post on what is called the normative universality of human rights.

These are the countries that are not yet state-parties (in bold the countries that have signed up but failed to ratify):

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Bahamas
  • Bhutan
  • Brunei
  • China
  • Comoros
  • Cuba
  • Fiji
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kiribati
  • Laos
  • Malaysia
  • Marshall Islands
  • Micronesia
  • Myanmar (Burma)
  • Nauru
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palau
  • Qatar
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • São Tomé and Príncipe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • Solomon Islands
  • Tonga
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Vatican City
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aid, globalization, human rights maps, work

Human Rights Maps (43): Dependence on Remittances

Remittances are money sent back home by migrant workers. Sometimes these amounts are more important than foreign aid and some developing countries are heavily dependent on them in the sense that remittances represent a large share of their national income or GDP.

remittances map

remittances africa

(source)

More on remittances here.

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human rights maps, war

Human Rights Maps (42): Global Peace Index

peace map

(source)

The Global Peace Index, created by the Economist Intelligence Unit, is based on 24 indicators measuring peace inside and outside of a country. They include the number of wars a country was involved in the past five years, how many soldiers were killed overseas and how much money was made in arms sales. Domestic indicators include the level of violent crimes, relations with neighboring countries and level of distrust in other citizens.

This are the maps for 2009 and 2010:

global peace index map 2009

global peace index map 2009

global peace index map

global peace index map 2009

Here’s another version:

global peace index

(source)

An interactive version is here or here. More on peace is here.

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discrimination and hate, equality, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (41): Same-Sex Marriage in Europe and the U.S.

same sex marriages us

same sex marriages in europe

(source)

UPDATE: As these things can evolve quite rapidly, here’s an updated version of the US map, dated January 2010:

US states that allow same sex marriage

This map takes into account the California repeal of 2008 (California is still partially colored in purple in the first map above), as well as the granting of marriage rights in Iowa in 2009 and in some East coast states.

Here’s another version, comparing the degrees of restrictions on the rights of same sex couples in the different states of the U.S. (there’s a lot of variation between the extremes of a total refusal to grant couples any sort of recognition and a legal right to marry):

gay marriage in the US degrees of restriction

(source, there’s an interactive version here showing the evolution since 2000, the major milestones and the detailed provisions in each state; another interactive map is here)

UPDATE:

same sex marriage rights USA map

(source)

UPDATE: and this is the situation dd. Februari 2012:

same sex marriage map US

(source)

gay marriage map

(source)

This is a very detailed map:

Same Sex Marriage

(source, click image to enlarge)

UPDATE: during the Presidential election today, November 7th 2012, Maine and Maryland also voted on ballot initiatives regarding same-sex marriage. Majorities of voters in both states approved it.

UPDATE: here’s an animated map for the years up to 2013:

california-gay-marriage-supreme-court-map

(source)

UPDATE: this is the situation dd. May 2014:

same-sex_marriage_US_map

More on same-sex marriage rights here, here, here and here. More on homosexuality laws. More on gay rights.

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human rights maps, terror

Human Rights Maps (37): Worst Terrorist Attacks

This map, compiled by Wm. Robert Johnston, and last updated 24 August 2008, shows the worst terrorist attacks, worst meaning attacks resulting in 100 or more fatalities:

map of worst terrorist attacks worldwide

(source, click on the image to enlarge)

Legend:

1: 13 Dec 1921: bombing of Bolgard palace in Bessarabia (modern Moldova) (100)
2: 16 Apr 1925: bombing of cathedral in Sophia, Bulgaria (160)
3: 18 May 1973: mid-air bombing of Aeroflot airliner, Siberia (160)
4: 4 Dec 1977: crash of hijacked Malaysian airliner near Malaysia (100)
5: 20 Aug 1978: arson of theater in Abadan, Iran (477)
6: 20 Nov-5 Dec 1979: hostage taking at Grand Mosque in Mecca (includes 87 terrorists killed) (240)
7: 23 Sep 1983: crash of Gulf Air flight following mid-air bombing over the UAE(112)
8: 23 Oct 1983: truck bombings of U.S. Marine and French barracks, Beirut, Lebanon (301)
9: 14 May 1985: armed attack on crowds in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka (150)
10: 23 Jun 1985: mid-air bombing of Air India flight off Ireland, and attempted bombing of flight in Canada (331)
11: 18 Apr 1987: roadway ambush near Alut Oya, Sri Lanka (127)
12: 21 Apr 1987: bombing of bus depot in Columbo, Sri Lanka (106)
13: 29 Nov 1987: mid-air bombing of Korean Air flight near Burma (115)
14: 21 Dec 1988: mid-air bombing of Pan Am flight over Lockerbie, Scotland (270)
15: 19 Sep 1989: mid-air bombing of French UTA flight near Bilma, Niger (171)
16: 27 Nov 1989: mid-air bombing of Avianca flight in Bogota, Columbia (110)
17: 3 Aug 1990: armed attack at two mosques in Kathankudy, Sri Lanka (140)
18: 13 Aug 1990: armed attack at mosque in Eravur, Sri Lanka (122)
19: 2 Oct 1990: crash of hijacked PRC airliner in Guangzhou, PRC (132)
20: 12 Mar 1993: 15 bombings in Bombay, India (317)
21: 22 Sep 1993: crash of airliner struck by missile in Sukhumi, Georgia (106)
22: 19 Apr 1995: truck bombing of federal building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA (169)
23: 14-19 June 1996: hostage taking in Budennovsk, Russia, and two failed rescue attempts (143)
24: 23 Nov 1996: crash of hijacked Ethiopian Air flight off Comoros (127)
25: 29 Aug 1997: attacks at Sidi Moussa and Hais Rais, Algeria (238)
26: 22 Sep 1997: attack at Ben Talha, Algeria (277)
27: 30 Dec 1997: attack at Ami Moussa, Algeria (272)
28: 4 Jan 1998: attacks at Had Chekala, Remka, and Ain Tarik, Algeria (172)
29: 11 Jan 1998: attack on movie theater and mosque at Sidi Hamed, Algeria (103)
30: 8 Aug 1998: truck bombings of U.S. embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Saalam, Tanzania (303)
31: 13 Sep 1999: bombing of apartment building in Moscow, Russia (130)
32: 31 Oct 1999: intentional crash of Egypt Air flight off Massachusetts, USA, by pilot (217)
33: 10 Aug 2001: attack on train south of Luanda, Angola (152)
34: 11 Sep 2001: crashing of planes into WTC, New York, Pentagon in Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA (2,993)
35: 12 Oct 2002: car bombing outside nightclub in Kuta, Indonesia (202)
36: 26 Oct 2002: hostage taking and attempted rescue in theater in Moscow (includes 41 terrorists killed) (170)
37: 29 Aug 2003: car bombing outside mosque in Najaf, Iraq (125)
38: 1 Feb 2004: two suicide bombings of political party offices in Irbil, Iraq (109)
39: 21 Feb 2004: armed attack and arson at refugee camp, Uganda (239)
40: 27 Feb 2004: bombing and fire on ferry near Manila, Philippines (118)
41: 2 Mar 2004: multiple suicide bombings at shrines in Kadhimiya and Karbala, Iraq (188)
42: 11 Mar 2004: bombings of four trains in Madrid, Spain (191)
43: 24 Jun 2004: multiple bombings and armed attacks in several cities in Iraq (103)
44: 1-3 Sep 2004: hostage taking at school in Beslan, Russia (includes 30 terrorists killed) (366)
45: 28 Feb 2005: car bombing outside medical clinic in Hilla, Iraq (135)
46: 14 Sep 2005: multiple suicide bombings and shooting attacks in Baghdad, Iraq (182)
47: 5 Jan 2006: bombings in Karbala, Ramadi, and Baghdad, Iraq (124)
48: 11 Jul 2006: multiple bombings on commuter trains in Mumbai, India (200)
49: 16 Oct 2006: truck bombing of military convoy near Habarana, Sri Lanka (103)
50: 23 Nov 2006: multiple car bombings in Baghdad, Iraq (202)
51: 22 Jan 2007: multiple bombings in Baghdad area, Iraq (101)
52: 3 Feb 2007: truck bombing in market place in Baghdad, Iraq (137)
53: 6 Mar 2007: two bombings and other attacks on pilgrims, Hilla, Iraq (137)
54: 27 Mar 2007: two truck bombings in Tal Afar, Iraq (152)
55: 18 Apr 2007: bombings in Baghdad, Iraq (193)
56: 3-10 Jul 2007: hostage taking and subsequent storming of mosque in Islamabad, Pakistan (102)
57: 7 Jul 2007: bombings in Baghdad and Armili, Iraq (182)
58: 14 Aug 2007: multiple truck bombings in Al-Qataniyah and Al-Adnaniyah, Iraq (520)
59: 18 Oct 2007: bombing of motorcade in Karachi, Pakistan (137)
60: 17 Feb 2008: bombing at dogfighting festival in Kandahar, Afghanistan (105)

There’s another list of terrorist attacks here. Below is this list in map form:

Number_of_terrorist_incidents_2009

Here’s another map showing the number of non-state terrorist incidents in the period 2000–2008:

Number of non-state terrorist Incidents 2000–2008

(source)

More on terrorism.

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health, human rights maps

Human Rights Maps (36): Number of People With HIV/AIDS

people living with hiv aids world map

(source)

And, expressed as a percentage of a country’s population, for 2005:

world map hiv aids patients as percentage of population of a country

(source)

And for 2008:

Estimated HIV-AIDS prevalence among young adults 15-49 by country as of 2008

Estimated HIV-AIDS prevalence among young adults 15-49 by country as of 2008

(source)

2009:

HIV prevalence map 2009

(source)

2012:

adult-hiv-prevalence-rate-2012-globalhealth

This is the evolution of new infections:

HIV AIDS new infections 2001- 2009

(source)

More on HIV/AIDS here and here.

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freedom, human rights maps, religion

Human Rights Maps (29): Freedom of Religion

religion freedom map

(source)
  • red = discriminates against all religions and intervenes with religious freedom
  • purple = favors the religion of the majority and intervenes with or limits the freedom of other religions
  • green = favors the religion of the majority and tolerates other religions
  • blue = tolerates all religions

Pew also calculates a ranking of countries’ legal or cultural restrictions on religion:

government restrictions on religion

More on religious liberty.

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