political graffiti

Political Graffiti (242): Free Speech Enforcement

A clever Banksy on Canal Street, Chinatown, New York City:

banksy graffiti is free speech

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If the title of this post isn’t immediately clear: the rat graffiti is the expression; the painter – who is a painted painter (look carefully) - represents government censorship (anti-graffiti laws can be seen as censorship but if you want you can see the painter as a mere metaphor for censorship); and the scissors are the enforcers of expression. In a sense, this is anti-anti-graffiti graffiti (no typo).

More generally, it’s true that in many cases people – like the rat – can only count on themselves to enforce their rights.

More Banksy. More graffiti.

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political graffiti

Political Graffiti (219): Police, Slaves of the Rich

LONDON, ENGLAND – APRIL 02: Police officers watch beside a graffiti adorned wall, as office workers pass the Bank of England building in the City of London on April 2, 2009 in London, England. Many City workers were returning to work today amid signs of yesterday’s protests against the G20 meeting being held today at the London Excel Centre. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

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More on what has been called “guard labor” here. More on government backed corporate expropriation here. This is in essence pop-Marxism, as you can read here. More political graffiti here.

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