Human Rights Poems

Most of the different daily posts that appear on this blog are organized into so-called “blog series”. For example, there’s a series called human rights poems: well-known and less well-known poems about human rights.

(subscribe to the RSS feed for this series only)
Human Rights Poem (1): Sudden
Human Rights Poem (2): Refugee
Human Rights Poem (3): Civilian and Soldier
Human Rights Poem (4): Poverty
Human Rights Poem (5): Our rights
Human Rights Poem (6): In Flanders Fields
Human Rights Poem (7): Democracy
Human Rights Poem (9): Souvenirs of Democracy
Human Rights Poem (10): The Unknown Citizen
Human Rights Poem (11): God’s War
Human Rights Poem (12): Democracy
Human Rights Poem (13): Shillin’ a Day
Human Rights Poem (14): No Rack Can Torture Me
Human Rights Poem (15): Farewell to a Name and Number
Human Rights Poem (16): Neighborhood Bully
Human Rights Poem (17): Dignity
Human Rights Poem (20): Two Monkeys by Brueghel
Human Rights Poem (21): Epitaph on a tyrant
Human Rights Poem (22): Hitler’s First Photograph
Human Rights Poem (23): Hatred
Human Rights Poem (24): Voices
Human Rights Poem (26): Psalm
Human Rights Poem (27): February 29th
Human Rights Poem (28): Punishment
Human Rights Poem (29): The Slave in the Dismal Swamp
Human Rights Poem (30): Injustice
Human Rights Poem (31): The Capital of Punishment
Human Rights Poem (32): War
Human Rights Poem (33): Hunger Camp at Jaslo
Human Rights Poem (34): A Task
Human Rights Poem (35): Incantation
Human Rights Poem (36): Statue of Liberty
Human Rights Poem (37): Shema
Human Rights Poem (38): Tortures
Human Rights Poem (39): On The Critical Attitude
Human Rights Poem (40): Questions From A Worker Who Reads
Human Rights Poem (41): The Solution
Human Rights Poem (42): The End and the Beginning
Human Rights Poem (43): Musee des beaux arts
Human Rights Poem (44): The Elf King
Human Rights Poem (45): I Sit and Look Out
Human Rights Poem (46): A Pict Song
Human Rights Poem (47): Refugee
Human Rights Poem (48): The White House
Human Rights Poem (49): The Slave’s Lament
Human Rights Poem (50): The Second Coming
Human Rights Poem (51): Grenadier
Human Rights Poem (52): The Laws of God, the Laws of Man
Human Rights Poem (53): Oh stay at home my lad and plough
Human Rights Poem (54): Revolution
Human Rights Poem (55): In Detention
Human Rights Poem (56): The True Prison
Human Rights Poem (57): Reveille
Human Rights Poem (58): Explaining the Declaration
Human Rights Poem (59): You Who Wronged
Human Rights Poem (60): When Evil-Doing Comes Like Falling Rain
Human Rights Poem (61): Somoza Unveils the Statue of Somoza in Somoza Stadium
Human Rights Poem (62): Female Product
Human Rights Poem (63): A Conversation
Human Rights Poem (64): For the Grave of a Peace-Loving Man
Human Rights Poem (65): The Development Set
Human Rights Poem (66): I Had No Time to Hate
Human Rights Poem (67): Warsaw
Human Rights Poem (68): Mary’s Song (Holocaust)
Human Rights Poem (69): The Orphan
Human Rights Poem (70): Bypassing Rue Descartes
Human Rights Poem (71): First They Came…
Human Rights Poem (72): Sow Flowers
Human Rights Poem (73): Militant
Human Rights Poem (74): Go Slow
Human Rights Poem (75): I, Too, Sing America
Human Rights Poem (76): September 1, 1939
Human Rights Poem (77): Once in Awhile a Protest Poem (Famine)
Human Rights Poem (78): The Cure at Troy
Human Rights Poem (79): I am a Negro
Human Rights Poem (80): The Suppliants
Human Rights Poem (81): O What Is That Sound
Human Rights Poem (82): What Work Is
Human Rights Poem (83): The Baghdad Zoo
Human Rights Poem (84): Suicide in the Trenches
Human Rights Poem (85): I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Human Rights Poem (86): The Homeland

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