iconic images of human rights violations

Iconic Images of Human Rights Violations (153): Women in Chicago Being Arrested For Wearing Bathing Suits

Women in Chicago being arrested for wearing one piece bathing suits, without covering their legs 1922

Women in Chicago being arrested for wearing one piece bathing suits, without covering their legs 1922

Here’s a similar image from somewhere else (looks like DC):

The swimsuit police checking the length of a suit, 1922

The swimsuit police checking the length of a suit, 1922

There’s obviously no human right to wear a bikini, but getting arrested for wearing one is a rights violation. And all this is indicative of society’s disregard for gender equality. The famous story of Annette Kellerman is relevant here. Kellerman was famous for advocating the right of women to wear a one-piece bathing suit, which was controversial at the time. According to an Australian magazine, “In the early 1900s, women were expected to wear cumbersome dress and pantaloon combinations when swimming. In 1907, at the height of her popularity, Kellerman was arrested on Revere Beach, Massachusetts, for indecency – she was wearing one of her fitted one-piece costumes.” Here she is:

Annette Kellerman

Unsurprisingly, women have been the main targets of the decency police. And yet, here’s an example of a man at a beach in the Netherlands being fined for not wearing decent clothes (in 1931):

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More iconic images of human rights violations.

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4 thoughts on “Iconic Images of Human Rights Violations (153): Women in Chicago Being Arrested For Wearing Bathing Suits

  1. QWerty says:

    “There’s obviously no human right to wear a bikini, but getting arrested for wearing one is a rights violation.” I see some sort of logical error in this statement. Something like: “There is no right to A. If you are not allowed to A, your rights are violated.” This is not a coherent statement. Do you see what I mean?

    I think this falls under the right to freedom of expression. Freedom to wear a bikini is enclosed within a freedom to wear whatever you please, which is a subset of freedom of expression, and therefore you have a right to wear bikini.

  2. Pingback: History: Iconic Images of Human Rights Violations - Think Research Expose | Think Research Expose

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