economics, ethics of human rights, philosophy, poverty

The Ethics of Human Rights (65): The Deserving Poor and the Spectacle of Libertarianism Eating Itself

mermaid eating itself

“this sauce is so good, I can’t help eating myself”

(source)

It’s a common right-wing complaint, especially among right-libertarians, that the welfare state helps the poor whether or not they have only themselves to blame for their poverty. If there should be a duty to help the poor, it should be limited to the deserving poor (although some libertarians think that even this goes too far since it implies a form of slavery for those who have a duty to help). All the others should suffer the consequences of their own bad decisions – their teen pregnancy, their lack of effort at school, their alcohol problem etc.

One could reply that people’s bad decisions aren’t always their own decisions, in the sense that making good decisions is something you have to learn, and this learning may be difficult in an environment of poverty, especially during childhood. However, let’s bracket this objection, for the sake of argument, and assume that there are indeed some people who only have themselves to blame. They may not be as numerous as those on the right tend to believe, but even if there are only a few we should decide what to do with them – help them or not.

The criticism that our current systems of social security don’t differentiate between the deserving and undeserving poor is sometimes illustrated with an analogy. If we assume that governments fund their welfare system through taxation, and that taxation is a kind of involuntary charity or enforced charity – the government steps in in order to take the money which we don’t give voluntarily to charity – then it’s only right that the government takes every effort to make sure that our money goes only to the deserving poor. If we voluntarily give money to charity, we also want to be sure that it goes to a good cause, and those collecting our money have a duty to spend it well and not waste in on people that aren’t going to use it constructively. Given the libertarian view that taxation is a form of stealing it’s all the more important that the tax money is spent well; you can perhaps argue in favor of stealing if the harm done by stealing is compensated by the greater good that is done with the stolen money, but you certainly can’t if there is no greater good and if the money goes to undeserving poor who are rewarded for their bad behavior.

Isn’t it especially outrageous to misuse charitable funds if the donors cannot legally discontinue their support? (source)

Now, it’s here that the problem begins and that libertarians who follow this reasoning tend to undermine their own libertarianism. If you want to help only the deserving poor, and if you want to be very strict about helping only those people, then you’ll have to accept systematic and wideranging intrusions into people’s privacy. How else would you be able to distinguish the deserving from the undeserving? You’ll need detailed biographies of all potential welfare or charity beneficiaries, records of their decisions and behavior, of their job applications, their diet, their sexual mores, etc.

obesity

You’ll have to accept these intrusions whether or not you believe that charity is the perfect and only solution. If you believe, correctly I think, that charity will never suffice, then you have all the more reason to be worried, since it’s the state who will have to monitor deservingness. Either scenario is anathema to libertarians.

The distinction between deserving and undeserving poor isn’t only difficult in practice. It’s also theoretically fraught with problems. For example, if you assume that you have a system to find out which poor person is an alcoholic and which one isn’t, then you still have to answer the question whether an alcoholic is an undeserving poor person or not. This answer depends on the causes of her alcoholism: maybe the cause is a series of misfortunes combined with a weak character, in which case her alcoholism is obviously not deserved. Perhaps she deserves blame for her weak character was, or perhaps not. One can easily make the case that a strong character and a good amount of effort and discipline depend on our upbringing and the social circumstances in which we are born. And no one deserve those circumstances.

And finally, even if we can identify the deserving both in theory and in practice, and even if we accept the anti-libertarian consequences of this work of identification, then we can still argue against the claim that we should not help the undeserving poor. Perhaps it’s a sign of decency and civilization that we help even the undeserving poor. Maybe the claims of the undeserving aren’t as strong as the claims of the deserving, and maybe we shouldn’t help them as much or as quickly as the deserving. But that doesn’t mean we should let them starve.

More posts in this series are here.

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4 thoughts on “The Ethics of Human Rights (65): The Deserving Poor and the Spectacle of Libertarianism Eating Itself

  1. Pingback: The Causes of Poverty (69): Self-Destructive Behavior | P.a.p.-Blog, Human Rights Etc.

  2. Blitz says:

    Based on my own interactions with right-libertarians, their generally agreed-upon solution to the deserving-undeserving dilemma is that the government should not help under ANY circumstance, because private charity will be able to help the TRULY “deserving.” It is worth noting that most of the people who make this argument have never experienced poverty, and enjoy options available to middle and upper class Americans when in trouble that the poor do not (i.e. “Friends and family will help you out, no need to steal from me.”)

    It is also worth noting that the people making this argument circumvent the clear inability of charity to take care of the many poor out there with the belief that very few of the people living in poverty today are of the “deserving” type, which charity will be able to distinguish (namely, by converting all anti-poverty organizations into non-profit employers; the poor do not get paid unless they work for it, then reimburse room and board costs from their own pocket). Once that pesky “gummint” gets out of the way, the majority of poor people will lift themselves out of poverty with the magic of the free market. Hurrah!

    I focus exclusively on the right-libertarians, as a significant portion of the GOP has co-opted their economic beliefs, making them especially relevant in modern politics–though now they seem to have fallen flat on their tails for it. “Mainstream” Republicans tend to be all over the board when it comes to public assistance and how much, but they usually agree there should be SOMETHING in place.

  3. Pingback: The Ethics of Human Rights (88): Justice and Proportionality | P.a.p.-Blog // Human Rights Etc.

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