causes of poverty, economics, poverty

The Causes of Poverty (53): Poor Economic Growth

economic growth wall street panic newspaper headline

“Wall Street in Panic” from 1929. Photograph: Hulton Archive/Getty

As an update of this previous post, here’s some more information about the nature of the relationship between economic growth and poverty reduction.

In a recent paper, Lane Kenworthy has compared growth and income data for 17 developed countries. Specifically, he looked at the ways in which the incomes of people in low to middle income groups benefit from economic growth. “Growth” here means increases in the amount of per capita GDP – this caveat is necessary in order to filter out economic growth that is the result of population growth and that doesn’t make the average person better off (although it obviously can make some persons better off, immigrants for instance). “Income” includes both wages and welfare benefits or other government transfers. Another preliminary remark: it’s wrong to think that growth automatically and by definition makes everyone – and hence also the poor – better off. It just makes the average person better off. That means that it can also in some circumstances make some people – e.g. the poor – worse off. Growth numbers are silent about the distribution of the effects of growth.

cartoon economic growth gdpThe question which the paper tries to answer is the following. Given that poor people can benefit from economic growth in two ways:

  1. either growth “trickles down“: more aggregate national income or production means more jobs, better paid jobs etc.
  2. or growth can increase the government’s tax base so that the welfare system can be made more generous,

which of these two mechanisms has been most prominent in the 17 countries examined in the paper?

The answer is “number 2″. Why? Well, in some of the selected countries economic growth was accompanied by a significant rise in low-to-middle household incomes, while in the other countries the effect of economic growth on the incomes of people in low-to-middle income groups was much smaller or zero. If economic growth trickles down (1), then one would assume it trickles down in all or most countries. After all, if growth results in more and better paid jobs for the poor, then there’s no a priori reason why this result would occur in one country but not in another.

The nature of government transfer systems is the reason why the effect of growth on the incomes of the poor is not the same in all countries:

when households on low incomes got better off, it was due most often to a rise in net government transfers. Where net transfers increased, incomes tended to increase in concert with economic growth. Norway, the UK, Sweden, Finland, and Denmark illustrate this pattern. Where net transfers were stagnant, income trends were decoupled from growth of the economy. We observe this in the United States, Canada, and Switzerland. This is an important finding. It means that, as a general rule, growth has not trickled down to low income households through wages or employment. And it means that, when government transfers haven’t grown, wages and employment haven’t stepped in to take their place. (source)

Looking at all this from the perspective of the causes of poverty: it’s clear that poor economic growth in wealthy countries cannot, by itself, explain poverty, because these countries can witness both growth and stagnation of the lowest incomes (as a result of their failure to implement the necessary transfer programs). Hence you can have growth without poverty reduction. If lack of growth is the main cause of poverty, then growth would by itself and automatically reduce poverty. We see that this is not the case.

In poor countries, on the other hand, growth can perhaps be sufficient. Those countries start from a lower base and more can trickle down. A lack of growth can, therefore, explain the persistence of poverty in developing countries, but probably not in developed countries. The latter have a basis of wealth that is large enough to fund welfare programs even if growth is poor. Growth helps to make this funding easier, but it’s not really necessary. A more progressive tax system, coupled with some good legislative will, can also do the trick.

More here.

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3 thoughts on “The Causes of Poverty (53): Poor Economic Growth

  1. Keith A. Sillsbury says:

    These kind of studies prove, you should never give someone money. You just become an en abler. Give a man a fish and he eats for a day, teach a man to fish and he eats for a life time. Healthcare and a warm bed is all the should be offered to anyone. If you want to pull yourself up the mountain then do so, if you wish to stand at the bottom and look up then do so but watch for falling rocks.

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